Rapper Forensic raps about Police Life

Forensic, policeman and rapper

Forensic, policeman and rapper

by Katie Christy

Forensic isn’t your typical music artist- he’s a cop by day and a rapper by night, keeping his personal identity anonymous. Maybe you’ve seen him cleaning up trash and graffiti from local areas with the community, volunteering his time with high school kids, or working the night shift for his police department. Or perhaps you’re one of Forensic’s over 40,000 Instagram followers who keeps up with his pro-law enforcement and comedic posts, community events, volunteer work, and music.

Forensic began writing poetry and music in middle school, but after a short stint pursuing his dreams as a rapper in high school, he took a break from music while in college. It wasn’t until a couple of years ago when a friend gave him some advice after listening to his music that Forensic decided to give his dreams another try. “He told me, ‘You need to do this, you need to use your talent to speak out for cops, to be there for cops and build on this,’” Forensic said.

Forensic in Studio A

Forensic in Studio A

Forensic realized many police officers do not have a voice, particularly given how law enforcement across the country over the past few years has been the subject of a great deal of backlash from different communities and groups. He intends for his music to give police officers that voice, to let listeners see into the life of a police officer for a few minutes in each song, and ultimately to humanize those who work in law enforcement.

“I use my music as a means to vent my frustration, to vent the frustrations of my brothers and sisters who do this job across the world, and give them a voice,” Forensic said. “Giving the people I work with a voice to speak about these things, not necessarily getting political with my music because I’m not really into that, but speaking out about PTSD, about the stresses of working a job that people don’t understand, about protests and violence and acts being done against you because you’re a cop, those kinds of songs that I’ve written in my mind help the people I work with.”

Forensic recorded his first album at Studio West with the help of Daniel Bourget, a graduate of The Recording Arts Center and staff engineer at Studio West. Daniel was actually featured on Forensic’s song “Fallen,” a song dedicated to the police officers killed in the Dallas, Texas shooting last year. “It felt like Daniel was reading my mind. Everything that I wanted to do on that track, he was already doing without me saying anything,” Forensic said. “To me, we had an instant connection with how to do music. Because of that, I’ve been to him every single time I’ve needed to mix any bit of music.” 

Forensic not only strives to help those through his law enforcement career, but also through his music, which is a hugely rewarding experience for him. “For me, that’s the most rewarding thing that I think any artist looks for- is influencing their fans to have something better,” Forensic said. “As an artist, when you get out and do something with your life, or make a difference, that’s what people want to see, and I think the artists are judged for that. My difference, I think personally, would be helping my fellow cops. And if that doesn’t help everybody, it is what it is. But if I help one cop, then I’m happy.”

One of Forensic’s most recent and popular songs, “Wolfhunter,” details the struggles and pressures that police officers face on a daily basis and can be found on YouTube along with his other work featured on iTunes and Spotify. Forensic also can be found on Instagram and Snapchat with the username @deputy_hookem. Forensic’s social media pages are not affiliated with any specific police department.